What a week

What a week it’s been, and no end in sight at the moment.

On the plus side, I have a finish. The postage stamp quilt is bound and quilted, and is currently hanging on the back of my daughter’s chair. I put this one aside for a long time, so its good to have it finished, and off the WIP and UFO lists.

One finished quilt, with the purple backing made into binding visible around the edges.
One finished quilt, with the purple backing made into binding visible around the edges.

I raced outside straight after finishing it, as I knew the weather was about to pack up. I had to photograph the last couple of leaves on the flowering cherry, which won’t bloom now till October, given it’s a later flowering type. I’m always sad to see the last leaves go, since it’s what I stare out my bedroom window at.

The bad weather arriving, which has led to much strife since this shot taken on Thursday.
The bad weather arriving, which has led to much strife since this shot taken mid afternoon on Thursday.

I used an online tutorial from Made by Rae to shorten the binding process, using the excess backing as binding. The tutorial said it was a better technique for small or art quilts. I guess there are reasons for this, but I’m not sure what they are. Does this binding method not stand up to wear and tear on a bigger quilt? If anyone has the answer, please feel free to educate me.

The purple backing and binding material. This method seems to result in a neat, tidy, binding edge for me. So, what are the disadvantages?
The purple backing and binding material. This method seems to result in a neat, tidy, binding edge for me. So, what are the disadvantages?

Friday the weather really arrived. My builder said he would replace a set of louvre windows after a wait of several months, weather dependent. I’m not sure what weather conditions would have been inclement enough to put a halt to it, but they barrelled on in, and four hours later I had a new window….plus a flooded laundry.

Louvres gone, new aluminium window almost there. They also replaced the sill, since there was some rot.
Louvres gone, new aluminium window almost there. They also replaced the sill, since there was some rot.

Since then, it has kept raining. My brother arrived last night, just back from Georgia, USA. He regaled us with stories of skunks, snakes that chase you, and general farming talk this morning. Little did we realise he should have hit the road early, because we are now effectively cut off with flooding, and he has no way of getting to his destination.

I took shameless advantage of his time in the USA, or “the land of quilting” as I prefer to think of it. I ordered quilt fabric and had it shipped to him. When he decided to leave some of his old farming gear behind, I ordered even more. Apparently he was nowhere near his baggage limits, so I could have ordered even more again, but I do try to pretend it’s an interest, rather than an addiction, in front of my extended family. I think my husband is starting to cotton on though.

So, back to watching the road closures on the internet, and the rain falling down. Keep dry out there.

Linking up to Crazy Mom quilts, TGIFF and Link a Finish Friday.

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7 thoughts on “What a week

  1. This is a really nice postage stamp quilt, what a commitment to make one. The blue border and purple binding work really well with all the colors. I think that the reason that binding technique is considered a little less durable is that it isn’t two layers on both sides of the quilt like double fold binding would be, but I think it would take a long time to see any difference, so don’t sweat it!

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    1. Thanks Judy, that makes sense. It also means I can continue to use the method for scrappy quilts that we use for winter evenings in front of the tv etc, which is great news.

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  2. About the binding… I’m not sure, but I suspect you end up with a more flatter look & feel to the binding when it’s done that way, yes? Whereas, like Judy said, the double folded is thicker on both sides, making those narrow edges on a larger quilt just a bit more substantial when one grabs the quilt to shake it out. But I think it’s good to try it out & see what you like!

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  3. Interest rather than addiction! Ha-ha!! You made me laugh 😄. I will frequently be quilt dreaming, and seem vague and distant to my husband, but I can’t explain that I’m comparing fabrics, considering block sizes and planning where to find the time all in my head- or the addiction would come to light! Enjoy your new purchases.

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  4. I think the main thing would be for durability as well. However, I meant to try it once but my problem is I always quilt off of the edges on the front of the quilt so I would have to unpick those stitches that connect the batting to the backing to be able to cut the batting off. Plus I like to just pull out my rotary cutter… So I imagine personal taste has a lot to do with it too. Do what you like 🙂
    Your quilt is very pretty and an impressive undertaking.

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    1. I used the same method of binding on a quilt over 20 years ago. It was constantly on my bed except for when it was being laundered all year round. 20 years later the binding edges have frayed and I’m going to add “proper” double binding to it one day. So enjoy your quilt as it is and in 20 years time think about replacing the binding!

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